Thursday, January 21, 2021

20 Best Metropolitan Areas for Chiropractor Pay

In a earlier commentary, we examined Chiropractor Pay in the Top 20 Metropolitan Areas.  While the largest U.S. metropolitan areas usually have more job openings for chiropractors, many smaller metro areas are where practitioners enjoy better average compensation. In fact, May 2019 data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) shows that not a single one of the largest metro areas in the nation were among the 20 best metropolitan areas for chiropractor pay:

Metropolitan Area # Employed Annual Mean Wages
1 Toledo, OH 40 $160,330
2 Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN 200 $149,580
3 Reno, NV 50 $140,260
4 Deltona-Daytona Beach, FL N/A $135,620
5 Evansville, IN-KY 70 $128,980
6 Urban Honolulu, HI 60 $125,660
7 Raleigh, NC 180 $123,770
8 Columbus, OH 300 $117,010
9 Akron, OH 80 $116,770
10 Rapid City, SD 40 $112,680
11 New Orleans-Metairie, LA n/a $112,410
12 Worcester, MA-CT 40 $112,380
13 Atlantic City-Hammonton, NJ 30 $112,150
14 Peoria, IL 60 $111,270
15 Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, SC 140 $110,000
16 Erie, PA 60 $109,930
17 Dayton, OH 90 $108,790
18 Boise City, ID 90 $108,700
19 Iowa City, IA 50 $107,690
20 Syracuse, NY 40 $107,650
National 35,010 $85,010

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics OES. Data extracted on October 26, 2020

Wednesday, January 20, 2021

20 Best Metro Areas for Health Services Management Pay

In a prior commentary, we examined Health Services Management Pay in the Top 20 Metro Areas.  While the biggest U.S. metropolitan areas are usually the home to the largest number of health services managerial jobs, it is often times the smaller metro areas where better average compensation awaits.  Secondary and tertiary labor markets offer fewer employment opportunities, but the qualified labor pool is smaller too.  Consequently, employers in smaller metro markets sometimes pay more to attract and retain talent than do their big metro area counterparts.  May 2019 data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reveals that only three of the largest metro areas in the country were among the 20 best metro areas for health services management pay:
 
Metropolitan Area # Employed Annual Mean Wages
1 Santa Cruz-Watsonville, CA 420 $163,280
2 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA 450 $159,190
3 Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT 1,200 $154,570
4 Salinas, CA 280 $154,440
5 Hanford-Corcoran, CA 120 $145,340
6 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA 2,030 $144,530
7 New York-Newark-Jersey City (#) 28,490 $144,370
8 Janesville-Beloit, WI 90 $143,940
9 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward (#) 5,560 $142,760
10 Binghamton, NY 190 $141,450
11 Boston-Cambridge-Nashua (#) 12,370 $139,240
12 Albuquerque, NM 880 $139,060
13 Parkersburg-Vienna, WV 100 $139,050
14 Corvallis, OR 120 $138,530
15 Danbury, CT 290 $138,100
17 Urban Honolulu, HI 1,280 $137,930
16 Cape Girardeau, MO-IL 140 $136,560
17 E. Sierra-Mother Lode CA non-metro 140 $135,720
18 Rochester, NY 1,040 $134,060
19 Santa Rosa, CA 450 $133,830
20 Durham-Chapel Hill, NC 1,160 $132,560
National 394,910 $115,160

(#) a top 20 U.S metro population area

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics OES. Data extracted on October 26, 2020

Tuesday, January 19, 2021

CHIP and Medicaid Child Enrollment in the Great Plains Region

According to the National Health Interview Survey (2019), about 41% of American under the age of 18 have publicly supported health insurance coverage. While health insurance plans for government employees, including military personnel, account for some of the child enrollment in publicly supported health insurance programs, the vast majority of such coverage is provided by Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Medicaid and CHIP are joint state-federal health insurance programs for eligible Americans with limited income and resources.  Medicaid is aimed at low income individuals and families, while CHIP is designed specifically for children from poor families with incomes too high to qualify for standard Medicaid coverage.  Federal reports from September 2020 reveal that there were 37.4 million individuals who were either enrolled in CHIP or who were children enrolled in the Medicaid program.

September 2020 data shows us that the seven-state Great Plains region accounted for about 3.6% of American children who were enrolled in CHIP and 6.1% of U.S. children enrolled in the Medicaid program.  Here is a deeper look at the numbers for CHIP and Medicaid Child enrollment in the Great Plains region:

CHIP and Medicaid Child Enrollment in the Great Plains Region
CHIP and Medicaid Child Enrollment in the Great Plains Region

State (1) CHIP (2) Medicaid Child Total
IA 80.2 272.8 353.0
KS 64.4 221.3 285.7
MN 1.3 558.3 559.6
MO 40.4 567.8 608.2
ND 2.5 45.5 48.0
NE 34.4 140.0 174.4
SD 16.1 67.8 83.9
Region 239.3 1,873.5 2,112.8
U.S. 6,719.1 30,641.9 37,361.0

(1) CHIP enrollment, in thousands
(2) Children enrolled in Medicaid plans, in thousands (derived by deducting State reported CHIP enrollment from State Reported Total Medicaid Child and CHIP enrollment)

Source: Medicaid.gov Enrollment Reports as of September, 2020

Friday, January 15, 2021

The Mental Health Care Shortage in the Far West

September 2020 data released by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) indicates that over 119 million Americans live in over 5,700 areas or settings designated as a mental health care Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA). A mental health care HPSA is a geographic area, population group, or facility where access to mental health care is substandard because it lacks a sufficient number of mental health care providers. With respect to mental health care, HRSA designation is based upon the population within the HPSA relative to the number of mental health care providers that service the area. Some areas receive a shortage designation because of the size of its population relative to the number of psychiatrists in the area, while others are designated based upon its population relative to the number of psychiatrists and core mental health providers. For HRSA purposes, core mental health providers include marriage & family therapists, psychiatric nurse specialists, clinical social psychologists, and clinical social workers. Although the population-to-provider ratio necessary to qualify for designation varies by HPSA type (geographic, population or facility), all mental health care shortage areas have a population-to-provider ratio that meets or exceeds certain thresholds stipulated by federal regulations. Areas designated as a mental health care HPSA can participate in federal programs aimed at attracting more mental health care providers to work with these underserved communities. The HRSA estimates that, as of September 30, 2020, all mental health care shortage areas in the U.S. would need about 6,500 more mental health care providers to eliminate all shortage designations.

More than 1,200 HPSAs in the six-state Far West region account for about 14.4% of the U.S. population who live in mental health care shortage areas, and about 13.5% of the national shortage of mental health care providers. The HRSA estimates that HPSAs in the Far West region would need more than 870 additional providers in order to eliminate the mental health care shortage in the region.  Here is a summary look at the mental health care shortage in the Far West region:

The Mental Health Care Shortage in the Far West
The Mental Health Care Shortage in the Far West

State (1) HPSAs (2) Population (3) Shortage
AK 304 377.7 16
CA 536 9,398.5 490
HI 32 516.7 25
NV 53 2,445.6 111
OR 120 1,576.7 82
WA 178 2,836.4 150
Region 1,223 17,151.6 874
U.S. 5,733 119,344.0 6,464

(1) Designated Geographic, Population Group and Facility HPSAs with a mental health care shortage
(2) Population of designated HPSAs, in thousands
(3) Mental Health Care practitioners needed to remove HPSA Designation

Source:  Designated HPSA Quarterly Summary, 9/30/20 (HRSA)

Thursday, January 14, 2021

The Dental Care Shortage in the Southwest

September 2020 data published by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) reveals that almost 60 million Americans live in dental care shortage areas. These areas, called Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSA) by the HRSA, are geographic areas, population groups, or facilities where access to dental health care services is substandard because of a lack of dental care providers. With respect to dental care, HRSA designation is based upon the number of people living within the HPSA relative to the number of dentists and dental auxiliaries (any non-dentist staff employed by the dentist to assist in the operation of the practice) that service the area. Although the population-to-provider ratio needed to qualify for dental care shortage designation varies by HPSA type (geographic, population or facility), all designated shortage areas have a population-to-provider ratio that meets or exceeds certain limits set by federal regulations. HRSA designated dental care shortage areas are eligible to participate in federal programs aimed at attracting more dental care providers to work with these underserved communities. Nearly 6,500 areas or settings qualified with the HRSA as a dental care shortage area as of September 2020. To eliminate all such shortage designations, the HRSA estimates that these HPSAs would need about 10,700 additional dental care providers.

More than 770 HPSAs in the Southwest region of the country account for about 11.9% of the U.S. population who live in dental care shortage areas and approximately 10.5% of the national shortage of dental care providers. The HRSA estimates that HPSAs in the Southwest would need more than 1,100 additional dental care providers in order to eliminate the dental care shortage in the region. Here is a summary look at the dental care shortage in the Southwest region of the United States:

The Dental Care Shortage in the Southwest

The Dental Care Shortage in the Southwest


State (1) HPSAs (2) Population (3) Shortage
AZ 208 2,338.2 380
NM 98 889.5 174
OK 164 852.5 138
TX 302 3,035.0 431
Region 772 7,115.2 1,123
U.S. 6,487 59,941.1 10,716

(1) Designated Geographic, Population Group and Facility HPSAs with a dental care shortage
(2) Population of designated HPSAs, in thousands
(3) Dental Care practitioners needed to remove HPSA Designation

Source:  Designated HPSA Quarterly Summary, 9/30/20 (HRSA)

Wednesday, January 13, 2021

The Primary Care Shortage in the Southeast

As of September 2020, about 81 million Americans lived in over 7,200 areas or settings that had been designated by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) as a primary care Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA). A primary care HPSA is a geographic area, population group, or facility that has poor access to basic health services because it lacks a sufficient number of primary care providers, a category that includes Doctors of Medicine (MD) or Doctors of Osteopathy (DO) who provide services as general or family practitioners, general internal medicine physicians, pediatricians, obstetricians or gynecologists. With respect to primary care, HRSA designation criteria is based upon the population within the HPSA relative to the number of primary care providers that service the area. Although the population-to-provider ratio needed to qualify for designation varies by HPSA type (geographic, population or facility), all primary care shortage areas have a population-to-provider ratio that meets or exceeds certain thresholds stipulated by federal regulations. Areas with a designated primary care shortage can participate in various federal programs aimed at attracting more primary care providers to work in these medically underserved communities. The HRSA estimates that, as of September 2020, all primary care HPSAs in the U.S. would need about 15,000 more providers to eliminate all shortage designations.

HPSAs in the twelve-state Southeast region of the country account for just over 33% of the U.S. population who live in primary care shortage areas and approximately 32% of the national shortage of primary care providers. The HRSA estimates that the Southeast region would need over 4,700 more primary care providers to eliminate the shortage that exists in the region. Here is a summary look at the primary care shortage in the Southeast:

The Primary Care Shortage in the Southeast
The Primary Care Shortage in the Southeast

State (1) HPSAs (2) Population (3) Shortage
AL 102 2,295.3 316
AR 88 647.7 93
FL 279 6,657.5 1,793
GA 234 3,202.8 636
KY 175 1,348.0 180
LA 154 2,251.2 248
MS 148 1,732.5 315
NC 189 2,028.1 323
SC 95 1,911.0 250
TN 136 2,440.5 263
VA 113 1,849.5 214
WV 105 639.4 117
Region 1,818 27,003.5 4,748
U.S. 7,203 81,516.3 14,945

(1) Designated Geographic, Population Group and Facility HPSAs with a primary care shortage
(2) Population of designated HPSAs, in thousands
(3) Primary Care practitioners needed to remove HPSA Designation

Source:  Designated HPSA Quarterly Summary, 9/30/20 (HRSA)

Tuesday, January 12, 2021

CHIP and Medicaid Child Enrollment in the Great Lakes Region

The National Health Interview Survey (2019) revealed that about 41% of children under the age of 18 in the U.S. have health insurance coverage funded all or in part by taxpayer dollars. While health benefit programs for local, state and federal government employees, including military personnel, account for some of the child enrollment in taxpayer funded health insurance plans, the vast majority of such coverage is provided by Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Medicaid is the joint state-federal health insurance program for eligible Americans with limited income and resources.  CHIP is a similar joint state-federal effort, one aimed at making available health insurance for children from poor families with incomes too high to qualify for Medicaid coverage.  Federal reports from August 2020 reveal that there were 37.1 million individuals who were either enrolled in CHIP or who were children enrolled in the Medicaid program.

That August 2020 data tells us that the five-state Great Lakes region accounted for 10.9% of the U.S. children who were enrolled in CHIP and 14.1% of U.S. children enrolled in the Medicaid program.  Here is a summary look at CHIP and Medicaid Child enrollment in the Great Lakes region:

CHIP and Medicaid Child Enrollment in the Great Lakes Region

CHIP and Medicaid Child Enrollment in the Great Lakes Region

State (1) CHIP (2) Medicaid Child Total
IL 296.3 1,105.8 1,402.1
IN 111.1 739.8 850.9
MI 58.7 927.1 985.8
OH 193.8 1,034.1 1,227.9
WI 69.1 468.9 538.0
Region 729.0 4,275.7 5,004.7
U.S. 6,691.1 30,400.2 37,091.3

(1) CHIP enrollment, in thousands
(2) Children enrolled in Medicaid plans, in thousands (derived by deducting State reported CHIP enrollment from State Reported Total Medicaid Child and CHIP enrollment)

Source: Medicaid.gov Enrollment Reports as of August, 2020

Monday, January 11, 2021

Surgical Technologist Pay in the Top 20 Metropolitan Areas

As of May 2019, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), there were 109,000 surgical technologists employed in the United States. Surgical technologists are employed primarily in hospital settings, but smaller numbers can be found employed in outpatient care centers, physician offices, and dentist offices. While most surgical technologist jobs require a post secondary education and certain technical skills, the wage scale for surgical technologists is marginally lower than it is for workers in most occupations. In fact, according to BLS estimates, as of May 2019 the national mean wage for surgical technologists was $50,110 per year, slightly less than the $53,490 annual mean wage for workers in all occupations. Surgical technologist pay varies considerably from region-to-region. May 2019 data from the BLS tells us the following about surgical technologist pay in the top 20 metropolitan areas in the United States:

Metropolitan Area # Employed Annual Mean Wages
1 New York-Newark-Jersey City 5,760 $59,620
2 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim 3,340 $59,110
3 Chicago-Naperville-Elgin 2,850 $51,370
4 Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington 2,300 $51,310
5 Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land 2,850 $53,560
6 Washington-Arlington-Alexandria 1,340 $60,220
7 Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach 2,260 $46,150
8 Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington 1,810 $47,470
9 Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Alpharetta 2,490 $49,560
10 Phoenix-Mesa-Chandler 1,550 $52,990
11 Boston-Cambridge-Newton 1,700 $58,470
12 San Francisco-Oakland-Berkeley 1,170 $72,790
13 Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario 920 $57,510
14 Detroit-Warren-Dearborn 1,930 $44,650
15 Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue 1,210 $61,240
16 Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington 1,250 $62,470
17 San Diego-Chula Vista-Carlsbad 660 $62,840
18 Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater 1,060 $45,230
19 Denver-Aurora-Lakewood 970 $54,250
20 St. Louis 760 $44,570
National 109,000 $50,110

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics OES. Data extracted on January 6, 2021

Sunday, January 10, 2021

Massage Therapist Pay in the Top 20 Metropolitan Markets

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), as of May 2019 there were about 107,000 massage therapists employed in the United States. Massage therapists are employed in a variety of settings, including spas, franchised clinics, physicians’ offices, hotels, and fitness centers. Most massage therapy jobs require a postsecondary education and certain technical skills, but the massage therapist wage scale is considerably lower than it is for workers in most occupations. According to BLS estimates, as of May 2019 the national mean wage for massage therapists was $47,180 per year, about 10% less than the $53,490 annual mean wage for workers in all occupations. The pay scale for the profession varies widely, with practitioners in some regions earning double what their peers make elsewhere.  This variation in pay is readily seen in May 2019 data from the BLS, which reveals the following about massage therapist pay in the top 20 metropolitan markets in the United States:

Metropolitan Area # Employed Annual Mean Wages
1 New York-Newark-Jersey City 7,440 $53,270
2 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim 6,320 $42,890
3 Chicago-Naperville-Elgin 3,890 $49,040
4 Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington 2,470 $50,490
5 Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land 1,580 $37,940
6 Washington-Arlington-Alexandria 2,200 $44,890
7 Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach 2,570 $46,420
8 Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington 2,320 $47,450
9 Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Alpharetta 2,060 $32,610
10 Phoenix-Mesa-Chandler 1,910 $45,230
11 Boston-Cambridge-Newton 1,880 $61,180
12 San Francisco-Oakland-Berkeley 2,200 $50,560
13 Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario 1,460 $41,610
14 Detroit-Warren-Dearborn 980 $47,690
15 Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue 3,360 $67,180
16 Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington 1,740 $51,420
17 San Diego-Chula Vista-Carlsbad 1,910 $42,050
18 Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater 1,080 $44,610
19 Denver-Aurora-Lakewood 3,490 $44,860
20 St. Louis 980 $38,820
National 107,240 $47,180

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics OES. Data extracted on January 6, 2021

Friday, January 8, 2021

The Mental Health Care Shortage in the Great Plains Region

According to September 2020 data published by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), over 119 million Americans live in more than 5,700 areas or settings designated as a Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA) for mental health care services. A mental health care HPSA is a geographic area, population group, or facility where access to mental health care is substandard because it lacks a sufficient number of mental health care providers. With respect to mental health care, HRSA designation is based upon the population within the HPSA relative to the number of mental health care providers that service the area. Some areas receive a shortage designation because of the size of its population relative to the number of psychiatrists in the area, while others are designated based upon its population relative to the number of psychiatrists and core mental health providers. For HRSA purposes, core mental health providers include clinical social psychologists, clinical social workers, marriage & family therapists and psychiatric nurse specialists. Although the population-to-provider ratio necessary to qualify for designation varies by HPSA type (geographic, population or facility), all mental health care HPSAs have a population-to-provider ratio that meets or exceeds certain thresholds stipulated by federal regulations. Areas designated as a mental health care HPSA can participate in federal programs aimed at attracting more mental health care providers to work with these medically underserved communities. The HRSA estimates that, as of September 30, 2020, all mental health care HPSAs in the U.S. would need about 6,500 more mental health care providers to eliminate all shortage designations.

More than 780 HPSAs in the seven-state Great Plains region account for about 7.2% of the U.S. population who live in mental health care shortage areas, and about 6.5% of the national shortage of mental health care providers. The HRSA estimates that HPSAs in the Great Plains region would need over 400 more providers in order to eliminate the mental health care shortage in the region.  Here is a summary look at the mental health care shortage in the Great Plains region:

The Mental Health Care Shortage in the Great Plains Region
The Mental Health Care Shortage in the Great Plains Region

State (1) HPSAs (2) Population (3) Shortage
IA 90 1,821.3 62
KS 128 1,383.3 54
MN 116 1,784.0 76
MO 246 1,871.9 143
NE 72 1,038.0 26
ND 71 303.0 22
SD 61 448.3 36
Region 784 8,649.8 419
U.S. 5,733 119,344.0 6,464

(1) Designated Geographic, Population Group and Facility HPSAs with a mental health care shortage
(2) Population of designated HPSAs, in thousands
(3) Mental Health Care practitioners needed to remove HPSA Designation

Source:  Designated HPSA Quarterly Summary, 9/30/20 (HRSA)