Saturday, January 30, 2021

20 Best Metropolitan Markets for LPN Pay

As we examined in LPN Pay in the Top 20 Metropolitan Areas, the biggest U.S. metropolitan areas are normally the home to the largest number of licensed practical nurse (LPN) jobs. However, a deeper dive into data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reveals that better average pay is often times found in smaller metro areas. May 2019 (BLS) data indicates that only four of the largest metro areas in the country were among the 20 best metropolitan markets for LPN pay:

Metropolitan Area # Employed Annual Mean Wages
1 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward (#) 6,870 $69,490
2 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA 2,690 $68,160
3 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA 680 $67,990
4 Anchorage, AK 220 $65,420
5 Santa Rosa, CA 680 $65,260
6 Santa Cruz-Watsonville, CA 230 $63,960
7 Napa, CA 210 $62,960
8 Boston-Cambridge-Nashua (#) 10,410 $62,620
9 San Diego-Carlsbad (#) 6,190 $62,310
10 Reno, NV 420 $61,550
11 Santa Maria-Santa Barbara, CA 660 $60,940
12 Madera, CA 220 $60,460
13 Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue (#) 4,210 $60,360
14 Sacramento--Roseville--Arden-Arcade 3,610 $60,290
15 Yuba City, CA 210 $60,200
16 Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT 1,960 $59,920
17 San Luis Obispo-Paso Robles, CA N/A $59,660
18 Hanford-Corcoran, CA 340 $59,420
19 Salinas, CA 600 $59,190
20 Redding, CA 450 $58,950
National 697,510 $48,500

(#) a top 20 U.S metro population area

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics OES. Data extracted on October 31, 2020

Friday, January 29, 2021

CHIP and Medicaid Child Enrollment in the Far West

Public funding plays an important role in children's health insurance coverage in the United States. Data from the National Health Interview Survey (2019) indicates that around 41% of American children under the age of 18 have health insurance coverage that depends on public funding. While health benefit programs for government personnel, including the military, account for some of the child enrollment in publicly funded health insurance plans, it is Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) that are the two chief drivers of publicly funded health insurance coverage for children in the United States. Federal reports indicate that, as of September 2020, there were 37.4 million individuals who were either enrolled in CHIP or who were children enrolled in the Medicaid program. Medicaid, the joint state-federal health insurance program for eligible individuals with limited income and resources, provides insurance coverage for more than 30 million American children. Another 6.7 million individuals are enrolled in CHIP plans. CHIP is a related joint state-federal effort to make health insurance coverage available to children from families with low incomes, but not low enough to qualify for standard Medicaid coverage.

As of September 2020, the six-state Far West region accounted for 23.4% of the national enrollment in CHIP and 17.0% of U.S. children enrolled in the Medicaid program.  Here is a summary look at CHIP and Medicaid Child enrollment in the Far West region of the United States:

CHIP and Medicaid Child Enrollment in the Far West
CHIP and Medicaid Child Enrollment in the Far West

State (1) CHIP (2) Medicaid Child Total
AK 13.7 85.1 98.8
CA 1,288.4 3,632.8 4,921.2
HI 25.4 124.4 149.8
NV 38.2 286.1 324.3
OR 133.8 304.1 437.9
WA 70.3 778.3 848.6
Region 1,569.8 5,210.8 6,780.6
U.S. 6,719.1 30,641.9 37,361.0

(1) CHIP enrollment, in thousands
(2) Children enrolled in Medicaid plans, in thousands (derived by deducting State reported CHIP enrollment from State Reported Total Medicaid Child and CHIP enrollment)

Source: Medicaid.gov Enrollment Reports as of September, 2020

Thursday, January 28, 2021

UCLA Health, our Trusted Link for January 2021

 

In 1951, the UCLA School of Medicine accepted its first students, and by 1955 its primary teaching hospital, UCLA Medical Center, opened on the campus. Today, UCLA Health is the top-ranked hospital system in California, and 4th ranked in the nation by U.S. News. The medical school is now named for David Geffen, and the campus also includes schools of nursing, dentistry, and public health. 

Major achievements:

  • In the 1960s, UCLA faculty developed the tissue-matching test that makes organ transplants practical. Since then, over 6000 liver, 8000 kidney, and thousands of other transplants been performed. 
  • The UCLA Geriatrics program, ranked 3rd in the nation by U.S. News, is famous for its Companion Care program. 
  • One of the earliest AIDS research programs has made numerous discoveries and therapy breakthroughs. 

Innovation and exploration at UCLA Health is driven by their commitment to diversity of talent and a culture of collaboration. Past successes include

Current endeavors include

UCLA Health publications are Vital Signs for the general public, U Magazine from the medical school, and Physicians Update

See how their ChatterBaby app diagnoses baby cries

Private Sector Employee-Only Health Premium Costs in New England

The annual cost for single premium (i.e. employee-only) health insurance coverage charged to private sector employers in New England is typically higher than in other regions of the United States. Only small firms, with fewer than 50 employees, in Maine find themselves looking at annual premium costs that are below the national average for similar-sized employers. Annual employee-only health insurance premium costs for small employers in the other five New England states, and larger employers throughout the region, typically run higher than national averages.  2019 data from the most recent Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a data survey administered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, reveals the following about private sector employee-only health premium costs in New England and nationally:

State (1) Smaller Firms (2) Larger Firms Overall Avg.
CT $7,607 $7,492 $7,516
ME $6,295 $7,720 $7,424
MA $8,017 $7,441 $7,540
NH $7,136 $7,284 $7,255
RI $7,483 $7,202 $7,263
VT $6,978 $7,415 $7,319
U.S. $6,920 $6,983 $6,972

(1) fewer than 50 employees
(2) 50 or more employees

Source:  Medical Expenditure Panel Survey  Table II.C.1 - Average total single premium (in dollars) per enrolled employee at private-sector establishments that offer health insurance by firm size and State: United States, 2019

Wednesday, January 27, 2021

20 Best Metro Areas for Occupational Therapist Pay

In a November commentary we examined Occupational Therapist Pay in the Top 20 Metro Markets.  Without question, the highest population U.S. metro areas provide occupational therapists with a greater number of employment opportunities than do smaller metropolitan markets. That said, the better compensation levels are typically found in smaller markets. In fact, May 2019 data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reveals that only three of the 20 largest metro markets in the nation were among the 20 best metro areas for occupational therapist pay:

Metropolitan Area # Employed Annual Mean Wages
1 The Villages, FL 30 $115,090
2 Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV 630 $108,870
3 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA 100 $107,450
4 Santa Maria-Santa Barbara, CA 60 $106,740
5 Salinas, CA N/A $106,660
6 Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario (#) 670 $104,970
7 Victoria, TX 50 $104,550
8 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward (#) 1,210 $103,740
9 Homosassa Springs, FL N/A $102,700
10 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA 420 $102,280
11 Visalia-Porterville, CA 70 $101,720
12 Punta Gorda, FL N/A $101,060
13 Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT 600 $100,980
14 Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale (#) 1,670 $99,570
15 Chico, CA 60 $99,060
16 Napa, CA 40 $98,860
17 Vineland-Bridgeton, NJ 50 $98,800
18 York-Hanover, PA 240 $98,550
19 Kankakee, IL 40 $98,420
20 New Bern, NC 90 $98,120
National 133,570 $86,210

(#) a top 20 U.S metro population area

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics OES. Data extracted on October 28, 2020

Tuesday, January 26, 2021

20 Best Metro Markets for Physician Assistant Pay

Previously, we examined Physician Assistant Pay in the Top 20 Metro Areas.  The largest U.S. metropolitan areas certainly provide physician assistant practitioners with many more employment opportunities than do smaller metro areas.  However, the better compensation levels are actually found in smaller markets. This can be readily seen in May 2019 data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), which shows that only two of the 20 largest metro areas in the nation were among the 20 best metro markets for physician assistant pay:

Metropolitan Area # Employed Annual Mean Wages
1 Salinas, CA 100 $161,370
2 Leominster-Gardner, MA 50 $156,250
3 Waterbury, CT 140 $154,550
4 Danbury, CT 130 $147,500
5 New Bern, NC 50 $146,880
6 Santa Rosa, CA N/A $144,230
7 Visalia-Porterville, CA 80 $141,840
8 Chico, CA 40 $138,270
9 Hartford-W Hartford-E Hartford, CT 910 $138,050
10 Yuba City, CA 80 $137,210
11 Norwich-New London-Westerly, CT-RI 70 $136,320
12 Spokane-Spokane Valley, WA 260 $135,970
13 Sebastian-Vero Beach, FL 50 $135,690
14 Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario (#) 1200 $134,630
15 Fairbanks, AK 60 $134,240
16 Olympia-Tumwater, WA 70 $133,470
17 Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue (#) 1,690 $132,610
18 Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT 290 $131,880
19 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara 640 $131,040
20 Midland, TX 30 $130,330
National 120,090 $112,410

(#) a top 20 U.S metro population area

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics OES. Data extracted on October 28, 2020

Monday, January 25, 2021

CHIP and Medicaid Child Enrollment in the MidEast Region

The National Health Interview Survey (2019) estimated that about 41% of American children under the age of 18 have health insurance coverage that depends on public funding. Health benefit programs for government personnel, including the military, are a source of some of the child enrollment in health insurance plans subsidized by taxpayer dollars.  However, it is Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) that are the two primary drivers of publicly funded health insurance coverage for children in the United States. Medicaid is the joint state-federal health insurance program for eligible individuals with limited income and resources.  Similarly, CHIP is a joint state-federal effort to make available health insurance coverage for children from families with low incomes, but not low enough to qualify for standard Medicaid coverage.  Federal reports indicate that, as of September 2020, there were 37.4 million individuals who were either enrolled in CHIP or who were children enrolled in the Medicaid program.

That same September 2020 data reveals that the five-state MidEast region accounted for 17.9% of the national enrollment in CHIP and 14.5% of U.S. children enrolled in the Medicaid program.  Here is a summary look at CHIP and Medicaid Child enrollment in the MidEast region of the United States:

CHIP and Medicaid Child Enrollment in the MidEast Region

CHIP and Medicaid Child Enrollment in the MidEast Region

State (1) CHIP (2) Medicaid Child Total
DE 11.2 99.9 111.1
DC 17.4 76.9 94.3
MD 143.0 504.7 647.7
NJ 239.8 619.9 859.7
NY 612.2 1,869.9 2,482.1
PA 177.9 1,276.7 1,454.6
Region 1,201.5 4,448.0 5,649.5
U.S. 6,719.1 30,641.9 37,361.0

(1) CHIP enrollment, in thousands
(2) Children enrolled in Medicaid plans, in thousands (derived by deducting State reported CHIP enrollment from State Reported Total Medicaid Child and CHIP enrollment)

Source: Medicaid.gov Enrollment Reports as of September, 2020

Sunday, January 24, 2021

The Mental Health Care Shortage by Region

September 2020 data from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) reveals that an estimated 119 million Americans lived in areas designated as a mental health care Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA). A geographic area, population group, or facility, residents of mental health care HPSAs have poor access to basic mental health services because the area lacks a sufficient number of psychiatrists and/or core mental health providers. For HRSA purposes, core mental health providers include marriage & family therapists, psychiatric nurse specialists, clinical social psychologists, and clinical social workers. HRSA designation criteria is based upon the population within the HPSA relative to the number of mental health care providers that service the area. Although the population-to-provider ratio needed to qualify for designation varies by HPSA type (geographic, population or facility), all HPSAs with a mental health care shortage designation have a population-to-provider ratio that meets or exceeds certain thresholds established by federal regulations.  As of September 2020, the HRSA estimates that all mental health care shortage areas in the U.S. would need just under 6,500 more practitioners to eliminate all such shortage designations.

Here is a summary look at the mental health care shortage by region (for state-level details, follow the "region" link):

Region (1) HPSAs (2) Population (3) Shortage
Far West
1,223 17,151.6 874
Great Lakes
710 18,095.8 837
Great Plains
784 8,649.8 419
MidEast
390 7,157.7 520
New England
193 2,173.0 120
Rocky Mountain
317 7,693.1 363
Southeast
1,236 35,483.3 2,198
Southwest
814 20,819.0 979
U.S. Territories
66 2,120.7 154
U.S. 5,733 119,344.0 6,464

(1) Designated Geographic, Population Group and Facility HPSAs with a mental health care shortage
(2) Population of designated HPSAs, in thousands
(3) Mental Health Care practitioners needed to remove HPSA Designation

Source:  Designated HPSA Quarterly Summary, 9/30/20 (HRSA)

Saturday, January 23, 2021

The Dental Care Shortage by Region

As of September 2020, an estimated 60 million Americans lived in areas designated as a dental care Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA) by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA).  A geographic area, population group, or facility, residents of dental care HPSAs have poor access to basic dental health services because the area lacks a sufficient number of Dentists and dental auxiliaries (any non-dentist staff employed by the dentist to assist in the operation of the practice). HRSA designation criteria is based upon the population within the HPSA relative to the number of dental care providers that service the area. Although the population-to-provider ratio needed to qualify for designation varies by HPSA type (geographic, population or facility), all HPSAs with a dental care shortage designation have a population-to-provider ratio that meets or exceeds certain limits set by federal regulations.  As of September 2020, the HRSA estimates that all dental care shortage areas in the U.S. would need just over 10,700 more practitioners to eliminate all such shortage designations.

Here is a summary look at the dental care shortage by region (for state-level details, follow the "region" link):

Region (1) HPSAs (2) Population (3) Shortage
Far West
1,173 5,522.0 1,016
Great Lakes
811 8,369.4 1,536
Great Plains
1,003 3,787.9 707
MidEast
384 6,288.9 1,168
New England
225 1,268.1 196
Rocky Mountain
410 2,446.4 334
Southeast
1,663 24,669.8 4,529
Southwest
772 7,115.2 1,123
U.S. Territories
46 473.4 107
U.S. 6,487 59,941.1 10,716

(1) Designated Geographic, Population Group and Facility HPSAs with a dental care shortage
(2) Population of designated HPSAs, in thousands
(3) Dental Care practitioners needed to remove HPSA Designation

Source:  Designated HPSA Quarterly Summary, 9/30/20 (HRSA)

Friday, January 22, 2021

The Primary Care Shortage by Region

As of September 2020, an estimated 81 million Americans lived in more than 7,200 areas designated as a primary care Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA) by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA).  A geographic area, population group, or facility, residents of primary care HPSAs have poor access to basic health services because the area lacks a sufficient number of Doctors of Medicine (MD) or Doctors of Osteopathy (DO) who provide services as general or family practitioners, general internal medicine physicians, pediatricians, obstetricians or gynecologists. HRSA designation criteria is based upon the population within the HPSA relative to the number of primary care providers that service the area. Although the population-to-provider ratio needed to qualify for designation varies by HPSA type (geographic, population or facility), all HPSAs with a primary care shortage designation have a population-to-provider ratio that meets or exceeds certain thresholds stipulated by federal regulations.  As of September 2020, the HRSA estimates that all primary care shortage areas in the U.S. would need just under 15,000 more providers to eliminate all such shortage designations.

Here is a summary look at the primary care shortage by region (for state-level details, follow the "region" link):

Region (1) HPSAs (2) Population (3) Shortage
Far West
1,374 13,240.8 2,654
Great Lakes
878 11,229.0 1,586
Great Plains
1,063 4,159.9 908
MidEast
416 6,733.0 1,558
New England
228 1,334.5 305
Rocky Mountain
466 2,971.0 540
Southeast
1,818 27,003.5 4,748
Southwest
898 12,595.8 1,983
U.S. Territories
62 2,248.8 663
U.S. 7,203 81,516.3 14,945

(1) Designated Geographic, Population Group and Facility HPSAs with a primary care shortage
(2) Population of designated HPSAs, in thousands
(3) Primary Care practitioners needed to remove HPSA Designation

Source:  Designated HPSA Quarterly Summary, 9/30/20 (HRSA)

Thursday, January 21, 2021

20 Best Metropolitan Areas for Chiropractor Pay

In a earlier commentary, we examined Chiropractor Pay in the Top 20 Metropolitan Areas.  While the largest U.S. metropolitan areas usually have more job openings for chiropractors, many smaller metro areas are where practitioners enjoy better average compensation. In fact, May 2019 data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) shows that not a single one of the largest metro areas in the nation were among the 20 best metropolitan areas for chiropractor pay:

Metropolitan Area # Employed Annual Mean Wages
1 Toledo, OH 40 $160,330
2 Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN 200 $149,580
3 Reno, NV 50 $140,260
4 Deltona-Daytona Beach, FL N/A $135,620
5 Evansville, IN-KY 70 $128,980
6 Urban Honolulu, HI 60 $125,660
7 Raleigh, NC 180 $123,770
8 Columbus, OH 300 $117,010
9 Akron, OH 80 $116,770
10 Rapid City, SD 40 $112,680
11 New Orleans-Metairie, LA n/a $112,410
12 Worcester, MA-CT 40 $112,380
13 Atlantic City-Hammonton, NJ 30 $112,150
14 Peoria, IL 60 $111,270
15 Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, SC 140 $110,000
16 Erie, PA 60 $109,930
17 Dayton, OH 90 $108,790
18 Boise City, ID 90 $108,700
19 Iowa City, IA 50 $107,690
20 Syracuse, NY 40 $107,650
National 35,010 $85,010

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics OES. Data extracted on October 26, 2020